Tag: food

Recipe's

Rocky Mountain Oysters


Prep Time: Cook Time: Total Time:

* Be sure to ask your butcher for calf testicles, not bull testicles. Calf testicles are the size of a walnut and are much more tender than the larger bull testicles.

** Use enough vegetable oil to fill your frying container halfway to the top (to allow for bubbling up and splattering) and to completely cover calf testicles while frying.


Ingredients

2 pounds calf testicles*

2 cups beer

2 eggs, beaten

1 1/2 cup all-purpose flour

1/4 cup yellow cornmeal

salt and ground black pepper to taste

vegetable oil**

1 tablespoon hot pepper sauce

Directions

  1. With a very sharp knife, split the tough skin-like muscle that surrounds each testicle. Remove the skin (you can remove the skin easily if the testicles are frozen, then peel while thawing). Either leave whole or slice each testicle into approximately 1/4- to 1/2-inch-thick ovals.

  2. Place slices in a large pan or blow with enough beer to cover them; cover and let sit 2 hours. In a shallow bowl, combine eggs, flour, cornmeal, salt, and pepper to make a wet flour dredge or closer to a batter consistency.

  3. Remove testicles from beer; drain and dredge thoroughly in the wet flour dredge.

    In a large, deep pot, heat oil to 375 degrees F. Deep fry 3 minutes or until golden brown (will rise to the surface when done). Drain on paper towels.

    Serve warm with your favourite hot pepper sauce.


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Recipe's

Chilean Potato Pie (Pastel De Papas)



Servings 8 Prep Time: Cook Time: Total Time:


5 cups potatoes, peeled and cubed

2 tablespoons butter, or to taste

salt to taste

2 eggs, beaten

1/2 cup vegetable oil

1 clove garlic, minced

1 onion, diced

2 tomatoes, diced

1 tablespoon tomato paste

1 pound ground beef

2 tablespoons shredded panquehue cheese

1/2 teaspoon chopped fresh parsley

salt and black pepper to taste

1 pinch cayenne pepper (optional)


Preheat an oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Grease a 2-quart baking dish.
Place the potatoes into a large pot and cover with salted water. Bring to a boil; reduce heat to medium-low, cover, and simmer until tender, about 20 minutes. Drain and allow to steam dry for a minute or two. Mash the hot potatoes with butter and salt. Let cool until just warm; stir in the beaten egg until smooth.
Meanwhile, heat the oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Stir in the garlic and onion; cook and stir until the onion has softened and turned translucent, about 5 minutes. Stir in the tomatoes and tomato paste; continue cooking until the tomatoes soften and begin to lose their shape. Add the ground beef and cook until browned, about 10 minutes. Stir in the panquehue cheese and parsley; season to taste with salt, black pepper, and cayenne pepper.
Spread half of the mashed potato mixture into the prepared baking dish. Cover with the ground beef mixture, then spread the remaining mashed potatoes over the beef to completely cover.
Bake in the preheated oven until the potatoes are hot and the top is lightly browned, about 40 minutes.


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Fun Food Fact

Did Johnny Appleseed really exist?

 


He sure did.   John Chapman (September 26, 1774 – March 18, 1845), his true name, was born in Massachusetts in 1774.  Johnny Appleseed was an American pioneer nurseryman who introduced apple trees to large parts of PennsylvaniaOntarioOhioIndiana, and Illinois, as well as the northern counties of present-day West Virginia. With the idea of the western frontier planted in his head, John Chapman set out, taking only an axe, a hoe, a Bible, and a bag full of apple seeds.   

Whenever he found a choice clearing of land, he planted his apple seeds, envisioning the wondrous orchards that would spring from each one.  He became an American legend while still alive, due to his kind, generous ways, his leadership in conservation, and the symbolic importance he attributed to apples.  Settlers welcomed him wherever he went because of the entertaining stories he told and the apple seeds he always gave away if they promised to plant them.  People soon forgot his last name and started calling him Johnny Appleseed.  Mr. Appleseed traveled the frontier for 40 years, often retracing his steps to care for the apple trees he’d planted many years before.

He was also a missionary for The New Church (Swedenborgian)and the inspiration for many museums and historical sites such as the Johnny Appleseed Museum in Urbana, Ohio, and the Johnny Appleseed Heritage Center in Ashland County, Ohio. The Fort Wayne Tin Caps, a minor league baseball team in Fort Wayne, Indiana, where Chapman spent his final years, is named in his honor.

According to some accounts, an 18-year-old John persuaded his 11-year-old brother Nathaniel to go west with him in 1792. The duo apparently lived a nomadic life until their father brought his large family west in 1805 and met up with them in Ohio. The younger Nathaniel decided to stay and help their father farm the land.  Shortly after the brothers parted ways, John began his apprenticeship as an orchardist under a Mr. Crawford, who had apple orchards, thus inspiring his life’s journey of planting apple trees. 

The popular image is of Johnny Appleseed spreading apple seeds randomly everywhere he went. In fact, he planted nurseries rather than orchards, built fences around them to protect them from livestock, left the nurseries in the care of a neighbor who sold trees on shares, and returned every year or two to tend the nursery. His first nursery was planted on the bank of Broken straw Creek, south of Warren, Pennsylvania. Next, he seems to have moved to Venango County along the shore of French Creek, but many of these nurseries were in the Mohican area of north-central Ohio. This area included the towns of MansfieldLisbonLucasPerrysville, and Loudonville.

 The site of his grave is also disputed. Developers of the Canterbury Green apartment complex and golf course in Fort Wayne, Indiana, claim that his grave is there, marked by a rock. That is where the Worth cabin sat in which he died.

41°636N 85°725W

Steven Fortriede, director of the Allen County Public Library (ACPL) and author of the 1978 Johnny Appleseed, believes that another gravesite is the correct site, in Johnny Appleseed Park in Fort Wayne,  Johnny Appleseed Park is a city park that adjoins Archer Park, an Allen County park. Archer Park is the site of John Chapman’s grave marker and used to be a part of the Archer family farm.  The Worth family attended First Baptist Church in Fort Wayne, according to records at ACPL, which has one of the nation’s top genealogy collections.  According to an 1858 interview with Richard Worth Jr., Chapman was buried “respectably” in the Archer cemetery, and Fortriede believes that use of the term “respectably” indicates that Chapman was buried in the hallowed ground of Archer cemetery instead of near the cabin where he died.


John H. Archer, grandson of David Archer, wrote in a letter dated October 4, 1900:

The historical account of his death and burial by the Worths and their neighbors, the Pettits, Goinges, Porters, Notestems, Parkers, Beckets, Whitesides, Pechons, Hatfields, Parrants, Ballards, Randsells, and the Archers in David Archer’s private burial grounds is substantially correct. The grave, more especially the common head-boards used in those days, have long since decayed and become entirely obliterated, and at this time I do not think that any person could with any degree of certainty come within fifty feet of pointing out the location of his grave. Suffice it to say that he has been gathered in with his neighbors and friends, as I have enumerated, for the majority of them lie in David Archer’s graveyard with him.

The Johnny Appleseed Commission Council of the City of Fort Wayne reported, “[A]s a part of the celebration of Indiana’s 100th birthday in 1916 an iron fence was placed in the Archer graveyard by the Horticulture Society of Indiana setting off the grave of Johnny Appleseed. At that time, there were men living who had attended the funeral of Johnny Appleseed. Direct and accurate evidence was available then. There was little or no reason for them to make a mistake about the location of this grave. They located the grave in the Archer burying ground.”


Johnny Appleseed is remembered in American popular culture by his traveling song or Swedenborgian hymn (“The Lord is good to me…”), which is today sung before meals in some households

“Oooooh, the Lord is good to me, and so I thank the Lord, for giving me the things I need, the sun and the rain and the appleseed. The Lord is good to me. Amen, Amen, Amen, Amen, Amen.”


NoFx – Johnny Appleseed


Many books and films have been based on the life of Johnny Appleseed. One notable account is from the first chapter of The Botany of Desire: A Plant’s-Eye View of the World by Michael Pollan.  Now Pollan states that since Johnny Appleseed was against Grafting, his apples were not of an edible variety and could be used only for cider: “Really, what Johnny Appleseed was doing and the reason he was welcome in every cabin in Ohio and Indiana was he was bringing the gift of alcohol to the frontier. He was The American Dionysus.”

One of the more successful films was Melody Time, the animated 1948 film from Walt Disney Studios featuring Dennis Day.  The Legend of Johnny Appleseed, a 19-minute segment, tells the story of an apple farmer who sees others going west, wistfully wishing he was not tied down by his orchard, until an angel appears, singing an apple song, setting Johnny on a mission. When he treats a skunk kindly, all animals everywhere thereafter trust him. The cartoon featured lively tunes, and a childlike simplicity of message. This animated short was included in Disney’s American Legends, a compilation of four animated shorts.

Supposedly, the only surviving tree planted by Johnny Appleseed is on the farm of Richard and Phyllis Algeo of Nova, Ohio.  Some marketers claim it is a Rambo,  more than a century before John Chapman was born. Some even make the claim that the Rambo was “Johnny Appleseed’s favorite variety”, ignoring that he had religious objections to grafting and preferred wild apples to all named varieties. It appears most nurseries are calling the tree the “Johnny Appleseed” variety, rather than a Rambo. Unlike the mid-summer Rambo, the Johnny Appleseed variety ripens in September and is a baking-applesauce variety similar to an Albemarle Pippin. Nurseries offer the Johnny Appleseed tree as an immature apple tree for planting, with scions from the Algeo stock grafted on them. Orchardists do not appear to be marketing the fruit of this tree.


Recipe's

Stuffed Mushroom Cap’s



• Servings 12 • Prep Time: • Cook Time: • Total Time: 70


Ingredients

12 whole Fresh Mushrooms

1 tablespoon Vegetable Oil

1 tablespoon Minced Garlic

1 (8-ounce) Package Cream Cheese, Softened

1/4 cup grated Parmesan Cheese

1/4 teaspoon Ground Black Pepper

1/4 teaspoon Onion Powder

1/4 teaspoon Ground Cayenne Pepper

 Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Spray a baking sheet with cooking spray. Clean mushrooms with a damp paper towel. Carefully break off stems. Chop stems extremely fine, discarding tough end of stems.

  2. Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add garlic and chopped mushroom stems to the skillet. Fry until any moisture has disappeared, taking care not to burn garlic. Set aside to cool.

  3. When garlic and mushroom mixture is no longer hot, stir in cream cheese, Parmesan cheese, black pepper, onion powder and cayenne pepper. Mixture should be very thick. Using a little spoon, fill each mushroom cap with a generous amount of stuffing. Arrange the mushroom caps on prepared cookie sheet.

  4. Bake for 20 minutes in the preheated oven, or until the mushrooms are piping hot and liquid starts to form under caps.


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God's Of The Cast Iron

How to Season and Care for Your Cast Iron Cookware


Straight Outta My Kitchen Showes you the ropes on seasoning your cast iron cookware.  This is what we like to call Seasoning and is important in the care and use of cast iron to prevent rust and create a natural non-stick cooking surface. Even if your inherited skillet or Dutch Oven has been neglected and Rusty, you can restore it by seasoning it again.



The more you use your cast iron the better seasoned it becomes. A black shiny skillet is a well-seasoned utensil and the one that will give the best flavor. Seasoning is done both for the inside and the outside of your cast iron, and even the lid must be seasoned. Here’s a hint to make your cast iron shiny again is to fry bacon and similar fatty meats. It will help it become seasoned faster and give you that shiny black non-stick interior you are working for.


Seasoning Your Cast Iron 


  • Apply a thin coat of Bacon Fat both inside and out

  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees and line oven rack with foil to catch drips

  • Put cookware upside down on the upper rack of your oven and bake for one hour.

  • Let the cookware cool before taking it out of the oven.

  • Store it in a cool, dry place and allow air to circulate around it

  • Never wash in a dishwasher.

  • Never ever use soap on your cast iron


 ∗ I personally use Bacon Fat really it is up to you on what you want to use to season your pan.  Also Check Out this  Oil Smoking Point



Now remember your cast iron cookware is going to piping hot coming of the oven,  so always have a place to put it and have oven mit’s on stand by.

 

Shout Out

7 Terrific Reasons To Learn How To Cook

 Straight Outta My Kitchen’s 7 Terrific Reasons To Learn How To Cook 


  1. Once you’ve got the right saucepans and the cookware you need, you’ll find cooking much easier, and that you food tastes better.

  2. . By cooking your own meals, you’ll know exactly what goes into your food. There’ll be no added salt or sugar, unless you put it in, and there’ll be no need for any preservatives or additives.

  3. To be more independent: You can be a lot more independent if you know how to cook. Cooking is an art that helps you feel content and happy. You can make your own recipes and be creative as much as possible.

  4. Being able to cook is good skill to have, and will stay with you forever.

  5. Cooking should be fun, and you’ll enjoy learning which foods go together, and what does and doesn’t work, as well as creating your own dishes.

  6. Cultural Lineage Teaching your family and/or loved ones to cook your family recipes or your favourite culinary creations can be a way to pass down information that will live on forever through food. This can help provide your loved ones with a means for survival.

  7. Expression of Love One of the greatest benefits of cooking, especially for others, is that by cooking you can express to others your love and show how you care for them.



What are some other good reason’s to cook share them in comment section

Shout Out

Who Really Uses 53 Organic Living Tips

 

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  1. Faucet water contains fluoride in all 50 states. Purchase a reverse osmosis filter to remove it. A Britta filter won’t be enough

  2. Chlorine in water will evaporate after a few hours. Just leave it in a filter or jug in your fridge overnight.

  3. Though Neogene bottles are BPA-free, they’ve been found to leech other chemicals. Use glass bottles to be 100% safe.

  4. Avoid anti-bacterial soap. Residue on dishes and hands gets in the stomach and kills your “good bacteria.”

  5. Cooking with coconut oil is better than olive oil. It has more omega-3 and doesn’t oxidize in sunlight or high temperatures.

  6. Tom’s toothpaste is a great alternative to traditional toothpaste. It’s fluoride free and avoids many additive chemicals.

  7. Setting up a vertical garden takes a week or two, but can pay off in organic produce for years.

  8. Coconut or almond based ice cream is a fantastic way to indulge, without eating dairy.

  9. Most organic eggs come from cooped up chickens fed organic produce. For true free range eggs, find a local farmer on localharvest.org.

  10. “Organically made” is not the same as “Organic.” “Freely Traded” is not the same as “Free Trade.” Those former foods aren’t certified.

  11. Avoid cheap vegetable oils at all costs. They’re high in Omega-6 and very unhealthy.

  12. Most “grass-fed” beef is still grain finished. For 100% grass fed beef, look for a local farm you can buy from.

  13. Most fruits have quite a high glycemic index. The exception is berries (including strawberries) which are low GI and very healthy.

  14. Think you can’t afford organic? Buy foods that are in season. It’s both more inexpensive and healthier.

  15. Have a favorite seasonal food? Buy it when it’s in season, then freeze it. It’s healthier than buying it out of season.

  16. Avoid large fish like tuna. Large fish eat small fish and build up higher concentrations of mercury.

  17. Avoid multi-vitamins. Instead, build your own vitamin stack. Most multi-vitamins skimp on the important nutrients.

  18. Consider supplementing Omega-3s. It’s perhaps the most important supplement of all for the health conscious.

  19. Look up and remember when your local farmer’s markets are. They’re cheaper, and you can ask directly about how the food was grown.

  20. Buy green cleaning products to avoid chemicals like ammonia or chlorine in your house.

  21. Not all food has to be labeled “Organic” to be healthy. If you’re buying directly from the farmer, ask how it was made.

  22. Sign up for your local fruit or veggie boxes. Farmers will deliver fresh organic produce straight to your door.

  23. See if there are food co-ops near you. These co-ops grow organic food and sell it to their local markets.

  24. Carrots, beets and radishes are very easy to grow. If you want to give growing a shot, that’s a good place to start.

  25. Try to eat as much of your produce raw as possible. Cooking destroys enzymes and can reduce vitamin content by 12x.

  26. Soak produce in 1/3rd vinegar and 2/3 rds water to kill bacteria, if eating it raw.

  27. Check the OCA’s website to buy organic foods online – organicconsumers.org

  28. Trader Joe’s is a great, lower-cost alternative to Whole Foods. Do you shop there?

  29. Subscribe to health coupon sites for deals. com, healthsavers.com mambosprouts.com

  30. Look for “specials” in supermarkets (including Whole Foods.) These mean the food’s in season and affordable.

  31. Organic beans are a great source of protein. Make sure you cook them thoroughly, as semi-cooked beans are toxic.

  32. Quinoa is a complete amino acid and provides your body with all the proteins you need. Yummy and easy to cook, too!

  33. Buy your organic chickens whole. It’s cheaper than buying by the part, and you can use the carcass to make broth.

  34. Most coffee shops (including Starbucks) sell Fair Trade but not organic coffee. Organic coffee is available online or in Whole Foods.

  35. Use the bulk aisle. You can buy everything from beans to quinoa to nuts while saving money and saving packaging.

  36. You can order organic snack bars in bulk, affordably at Amazon.com. It’s as much as 50% cheaper than buying at the store.

  37. Never eat the skin of non-organic papayas or mangos. Some are dipped in toxic pesticides when they cross the border.

  38. When buying seeds, make sure you’re buying non-GMO. If it doesn’t say it’s non-GMO, don’t assume that it is.

  39. Make your jams at home. Most commercial jams (even organic) like peanut butter jam or strawberry jam are high in sugar.

  40. Agave nectar isn’t much healthier than traditional sugar. Organic honey is better, while organic coconut sugar is best.

  41. Store your olive oil in a dry place, outside of sunlight. Oxidized olive oil is very dangerous.

  42. Nut milks in supermarkets contain a lot of additive ingredients. For best results, make your own. It only takes 10 mins.

  43. Nuts can be healthy snacks, but they’re also very high in fat and calories. Enjoy them, but eat in moderation.

  44. Bananas are high GI and low in nutritional value. Plantains are low GI and much healthier. But they need to be cooked.

  45. Add a few Brazil nuts to your diet. It’s one of the few foods high in selenium, which is good for your hormones and your thyroid.

  46. Buy good salt. Good salt can add dozens of minerals to your diet. One jar of Himalayan sea salt can last a year.

  47. Avoid Teflon. If you must cook with Teflon, never ever place metal into the pan.

  48. Rice has very little nutritional value, but isn’t unhealthy either. Use sparingly.

  49. Don’t forget about eBay. You can find great deals for organic foods at steep discounts!

  50. Stay to the end of Farmer’s Markets. They’ll often give out last-minute deals to clear out inventory.

  51. Put paper towels on the edges of your fridge’s veggie drawer. It’ll draw the moisture and preserve your greens.

  52. Spinach wilted? As long as it doesn’t don’t smell, you can still cook it and it will be just as good.

  53. Check Meetup.com for organic potlucks and meetups. They can be a fun way to add variety to your diet


Herbs & Spices

How Did Sage Become the Best? Find Out.

Sage is a relative to the mint family. It is common for Sage to be ground, whole or rubbed but is generally in more of a coarse grain. Sage is grown in the United States but is also grown in Albania and Dalmatia. Sage is a very popular herb in the United States and is used quite frequently for flavoring such things as Sausage, Pork, Lamb, and other meats, Salads, Pickles, Cheese, and Stuffing. The smell of Sage is very aromatic and distinct.

Sage loves to hang around in the kitchen with Thyme, Rosemary, and Basil. They work very well together. Sage is normally one of the main herbs in stuffing for poultry but is often added to lamb and pork dishes as well. Sage is very strong and should be used sparingly as a little goes a long way. Sage, like many other herbs develops its full flavor the longer it cooks and withstands lengthy cooking times which might be why it is so good when used in the stuffing for the Thanksgiving turkey that cooks for about five hours.

If you grow your own Sage you will find that all you have to do is snip off the tops of the plant with scissors and add it right to your favorite recipe. Sage is still at its best when dried but if you prefer just simply place the fresh Sage leaves in a baggie in the freezer and pull them out as required.

Today, Sage has no medicinal purposes to speak of but back in a different time Sage was used regularly to cure snake bites and was also used to invigorate the body and cleanse the mind. In the middle ages it was quite common for people to make a Sage Tea and drink it for ailments such as colds, fever, liver trouble, and epilepsy.

Although there is nothing to solidify these claims it is also said that a chewed Sage leaf applied to a sting or an insect bite will reduce the sting and bring down the swelling. Sage tea has been said to soothe a sore throat and also help in drying up a mother’s breast milk and also reduces blood clots. Further it has been known to help with itching skin if it is added to hot bath water. Today, it is mainly the Native Indians who still rely on the Herbal Powers Of Sage.

The word Sage means salvation from its Latin origin and is associated with longevity, immortality, and mental capacity. Sage never loses its fragrance even after being dried out so it is often added to potpourri and is also added to many soaps and perfumes. It has been used in insect repellents and has antibacterial properties which have helped it become a preservative for many things such as meats, fish, and condiments. Sage has a musky smoky flavor and works very nicely for cutting down some of the richness in many foods. It also goes great with almost any vegetable too. Sage is definitely an herb that most people almost always have in their pantry if they do any cooking at all.


Other Cool Sage Link’s

  1. 10 Best Bacon Sage And Onion Stuffing Recipes

  2. 17 Surprising Benefits of Sage Essential Oil 


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Herbs & Spices

The Cloves Article of Your Dreams

 


Cloves are definitely one of the most distinct herbs around but ironically enough, cloves have been around forever and are not finished doing business just yet. Usually if you can not get your hands on some cloves, Allspice can be a substitute. Cloves have some preservative properties to them but they work well as an antiseptic, expectorant, anesthetic, or an Emmenogogue, working well on the kidneys, the spleen and the stomach.

Some make a combination of Cloves, Bay Leaves, Cinnamon, and Marjoram for a hot tea that helps bronchitis, asthma, coughs, a tendency to infection, tuberculosis, altitude sickness, nervous stomach, nausea, diarrhea, flatulence, indigestion, dyspepsia, gastroenteritis, the side effects of lobelia, and depression. Sometimes people mix cloves with hot water, again making a tea and claim that it helps them get a good night’s sleep.



Cloves and ginger is a sure way to settle the stomach and stop vomiting. If you combine equal parts of cloves and basil it is supposed to detox meals from the body. Cloves have been used for failing eyesight and tooth problems. It was used for earaches very often throughout history as putting a little warmed oil of clove on a piece of cotton and in your ear was certain to rid any earache. Mostly, cloves are known for being warm and spicy but also have a strong relationship with pain relief, easing nausea and vomiting, and improving digestion. Cloves also kill intestinal parasites and act as an antimicrobial agent against fungi and bacteria. It has also been suggested that cloves have antihistamine properties as well.


Do not be too quick to pass off the possibilities of cloves and aromatherapy as the two have a very strong bond between them. Since cloves have such a positive and stimulating effect on the mind they pair up great with other oils for aromatherapy purposes. In the 16th and 17th centuries cloves were worth their weight in gold however it is the clove oil that is most essential. In Indonesia many people Smoke Clove Cigarettes and that did spill over into the United States for a while but lost most of its vigor when it was found that clove cigarettes could cause adult respiratory distress syndrome.

The word clove comes from the Latin word “Clavus” which means nail. If you have ever looked at a clove you will notice that it does resemble a nail. Many people use whole cloves when they cook ham by sticking the spiky part around the outer edges of the ham for extra flavor. Indian Curries can not do without cloves but it is also used in pickles, sauces, Worcestershire sauce, and even spice cakes that are baked from scratch.


Throughout history cloves has never been forgotten but has lost some of its popularity. Some still use it as a spice and some for minor dentistry and even still more for the purpose of Aromatherapy. People still look at cloves as an “Old Fashioned” herb. For some families it has been passed down through generations and in the pantry still sits a jar of whole cloves for that Special Ham Dinner.


Linking Up With Cloves


 

 

Shout Out

I’m On We Graze Together List

Here you’ll find a list of Established Food Bloggers (Worldwide) each unique, as the special individuals behind the blog. Learn about them through their Blogs, enjoy their recipes, have the ability to follow them or receive emails directly on new posts, peruse 24/7 their recipe indexes, learn some tips, print the recipes, cook, bake, and enjoy! Make […]

via Participating Food Blogs… — “We Graze Together”