Tag: Eating

We all need to do it to survive

Recipe's

Rocky Mountain Oysters


Prep Time: Cook Time: Total Time:

* Be sure to ask your butcher for calf testicles, not bull testicles. Calf testicles are the size of a walnut and are much more tender than the larger bull testicles.

** Use enough vegetable oil to fill your frying container halfway to the top (to allow for bubbling up and splattering) and to completely cover calf testicles while frying.


Ingredients

2 pounds calf testicles*

2 cups beer

2 eggs, beaten

1 1/2 cup all-purpose flour

1/4 cup yellow cornmeal

salt and ground black pepper to taste

vegetable oil**

1 tablespoon hot pepper sauce

Directions

  1. With a very sharp knife, split the tough skin-like muscle that surrounds each testicle. Remove the skin (you can remove the skin easily if the testicles are frozen, then peel while thawing). Either leave whole or slice each testicle into approximately 1/4- to 1/2-inch-thick ovals.

  2. Place slices in a large pan or blow with enough beer to cover them; cover and let sit 2 hours. In a shallow bowl, combine eggs, flour, cornmeal, salt, and pepper to make a wet flour dredge or closer to a batter consistency.

  3. Remove testicles from beer; drain and dredge thoroughly in the wet flour dredge.

    In a large, deep pot, heat oil to 375 degrees F. Deep fry 3 minutes or until golden brown (will rise to the surface when done). Drain on paper towels.

    Serve warm with your favourite hot pepper sauce.


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Shout Out

7 Terrific Reasons To Learn How To Cook

 Straight Outta My Kitchen’s 7 Terrific Reasons To Learn How To Cook 


  1. Once you’ve got the right saucepans and the cookware you need, you’ll find cooking much easier, and that you food tastes better.

  2. . By cooking your own meals, you’ll know exactly what goes into your food. There’ll be no added salt or sugar, unless you put it in, and there’ll be no need for any preservatives or additives.

  3. To be more independent: You can be a lot more independent if you know how to cook. Cooking is an art that helps you feel content and happy. You can make your own recipes and be creative as much as possible.

  4. Being able to cook is good skill to have, and will stay with you forever.

  5. Cooking should be fun, and you’ll enjoy learning which foods go together, and what does and doesn’t work, as well as creating your own dishes.

  6. Cultural Lineage Teaching your family and/or loved ones to cook your family recipes or your favourite culinary creations can be a way to pass down information that will live on forever through food. This can help provide your loved ones with a means for survival.

  7. Expression of Love One of the greatest benefits of cooking, especially for others, is that by cooking you can express to others your love and show how you care for them.



What are some other good reason’s to cook share them in comment section

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Who Really Uses 53 Organic Living Tips

 

regrowing-vegetables-1170x425


  1. Faucet water contains fluoride in all 50 states. Purchase a reverse osmosis filter to remove it. A Britta filter won’t be enough

  2. Chlorine in water will evaporate after a few hours. Just leave it in a filter or jug in your fridge overnight.

  3. Though Neogene bottles are BPA-free, they’ve been found to leech other chemicals. Use glass bottles to be 100% safe.

  4. Avoid anti-bacterial soap. Residue on dishes and hands gets in the stomach and kills your “good bacteria.”

  5. Cooking with coconut oil is better than olive oil. It has more omega-3 and doesn’t oxidize in sunlight or high temperatures.

  6. Tom’s toothpaste is a great alternative to traditional toothpaste. It’s fluoride free and avoids many additive chemicals.

  7. Setting up a vertical garden takes a week or two, but can pay off in organic produce for years.

  8. Coconut or almond based ice cream is a fantastic way to indulge, without eating dairy.

  9. Most organic eggs come from cooped up chickens fed organic produce. For true free range eggs, find a local farmer on localharvest.org.

  10. “Organically made” is not the same as “Organic.” “Freely Traded” is not the same as “Free Trade.” Those former foods aren’t certified.

  11. Avoid cheap vegetable oils at all costs. They’re high in Omega-6 and very unhealthy.

  12. Most “grass-fed” beef is still grain finished. For 100% grass fed beef, look for a local farm you can buy from.

  13. Most fruits have quite a high glycemic index. The exception is berries (including strawberries) which are low GI and very healthy.

  14. Think you can’t afford organic? Buy foods that are in season. It’s both more inexpensive and healthier.

  15. Have a favorite seasonal food? Buy it when it’s in season, then freeze it. It’s healthier than buying it out of season.

  16. Avoid large fish like tuna. Large fish eat small fish and build up higher concentrations of mercury.

  17. Avoid multi-vitamins. Instead, build your own vitamin stack. Most multi-vitamins skimp on the important nutrients.

  18. Consider supplementing Omega-3s. It’s perhaps the most important supplement of all for the health conscious.

  19. Look up and remember when your local farmer’s markets are. They’re cheaper, and you can ask directly about how the food was grown.

  20. Buy green cleaning products to avoid chemicals like ammonia or chlorine in your house.

  21. Not all food has to be labeled “Organic” to be healthy. If you’re buying directly from the farmer, ask how it was made.

  22. Sign up for your local fruit or veggie boxes. Farmers will deliver fresh organic produce straight to your door.

  23. See if there are food co-ops near you. These co-ops grow organic food and sell it to their local markets.

  24. Carrots, beets and radishes are very easy to grow. If you want to give growing a shot, that’s a good place to start.

  25. Try to eat as much of your produce raw as possible. Cooking destroys enzymes and can reduce vitamin content by 12x.

  26. Soak produce in 1/3rd vinegar and 2/3 rds water to kill bacteria, if eating it raw.

  27. Check the OCA’s website to buy organic foods online – organicconsumers.org

  28. Trader Joe’s is a great, lower-cost alternative to Whole Foods. Do you shop there?

  29. Subscribe to health coupon sites for deals. com, healthsavers.com mambosprouts.com

  30. Look for “specials” in supermarkets (including Whole Foods.) These mean the food’s in season and affordable.

  31. Organic beans are a great source of protein. Make sure you cook them thoroughly, as semi-cooked beans are toxic.

  32. Quinoa is a complete amino acid and provides your body with all the proteins you need. Yummy and easy to cook, too!

  33. Buy your organic chickens whole. It’s cheaper than buying by the part, and you can use the carcass to make broth.

  34. Most coffee shops (including Starbucks) sell Fair Trade but not organic coffee. Organic coffee is available online or in Whole Foods.

  35. Use the bulk aisle. You can buy everything from beans to quinoa to nuts while saving money and saving packaging.

  36. You can order organic snack bars in bulk, affordably at Amazon.com. It’s as much as 50% cheaper than buying at the store.

  37. Never eat the skin of non-organic papayas or mangos. Some are dipped in toxic pesticides when they cross the border.

  38. When buying seeds, make sure you’re buying non-GMO. If it doesn’t say it’s non-GMO, don’t assume that it is.

  39. Make your jams at home. Most commercial jams (even organic) like peanut butter jam or strawberry jam are high in sugar.

  40. Agave nectar isn’t much healthier than traditional sugar. Organic honey is better, while organic coconut sugar is best.

  41. Store your olive oil in a dry place, outside of sunlight. Oxidized olive oil is very dangerous.

  42. Nut milks in supermarkets contain a lot of additive ingredients. For best results, make your own. It only takes 10 mins.

  43. Nuts can be healthy snacks, but they’re also very high in fat and calories. Enjoy them, but eat in moderation.

  44. Bananas are high GI and low in nutritional value. Plantains are low GI and much healthier. But they need to be cooked.

  45. Add a few Brazil nuts to your diet. It’s one of the few foods high in selenium, which is good for your hormones and your thyroid.

  46. Buy good salt. Good salt can add dozens of minerals to your diet. One jar of Himalayan sea salt can last a year.

  47. Avoid Teflon. If you must cook with Teflon, never ever place metal into the pan.

  48. Rice has very little nutritional value, but isn’t unhealthy either. Use sparingly.

  49. Don’t forget about eBay. You can find great deals for organic foods at steep discounts!

  50. Stay to the end of Farmer’s Markets. They’ll often give out last-minute deals to clear out inventory.

  51. Put paper towels on the edges of your fridge’s veggie drawer. It’ll draw the moisture and preserve your greens.

  52. Spinach wilted? As long as it doesn’t don’t smell, you can still cook it and it will be just as good.

  53. Check Meetup.com for organic potlucks and meetups. They can be a fun way to add variety to your diet


Herbs & Spices

How Did Sage Become the Best? Find Out.

Sage is a relative to the mint family. It is common for Sage to be ground, whole or rubbed but is generally in more of a coarse grain. Sage is grown in the United States but is also grown in Albania and Dalmatia. Sage is a very popular herb in the United States and is used quite frequently for flavoring such things as Sausage, Pork, Lamb, and other meats, Salads, Pickles, Cheese, and Stuffing. The smell of Sage is very aromatic and distinct.

Sage loves to hang around in the kitchen with Thyme, Rosemary, and Basil. They work very well together. Sage is normally one of the main herbs in stuffing for poultry but is often added to lamb and pork dishes as well. Sage is very strong and should be used sparingly as a little goes a long way. Sage, like many other herbs develops its full flavor the longer it cooks and withstands lengthy cooking times which might be why it is so good when used in the stuffing for the Thanksgiving turkey that cooks for about five hours.

If you grow your own Sage you will find that all you have to do is snip off the tops of the plant with scissors and add it right to your favorite recipe. Sage is still at its best when dried but if you prefer just simply place the fresh Sage leaves in a baggie in the freezer and pull them out as required.

Today, Sage has no medicinal purposes to speak of but back in a different time Sage was used regularly to cure snake bites and was also used to invigorate the body and cleanse the mind. In the middle ages it was quite common for people to make a Sage Tea and drink it for ailments such as colds, fever, liver trouble, and epilepsy.

Although there is nothing to solidify these claims it is also said that a chewed Sage leaf applied to a sting or an insect bite will reduce the sting and bring down the swelling. Sage tea has been said to soothe a sore throat and also help in drying up a mother’s breast milk and also reduces blood clots. Further it has been known to help with itching skin if it is added to hot bath water. Today, it is mainly the Native Indians who still rely on the Herbal Powers Of Sage.

The word Sage means salvation from its Latin origin and is associated with longevity, immortality, and mental capacity. Sage never loses its fragrance even after being dried out so it is often added to potpourri and is also added to many soaps and perfumes. It has been used in insect repellents and has antibacterial properties which have helped it become a preservative for many things such as meats, fish, and condiments. Sage has a musky smoky flavor and works very nicely for cutting down some of the richness in many foods. It also goes great with almost any vegetable too. Sage is definitely an herb that most people almost always have in their pantry if they do any cooking at all.


Other Cool Sage Link’s

  1. 10 Best Bacon Sage And Onion Stuffing Recipes

  2. 17 Surprising Benefits of Sage Essential Oil 


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I’m On We Graze Together List

Here you’ll find a list of Established Food Bloggers (Worldwide) each unique, as the special individuals behind the blog. Learn about them through their Blogs, enjoy their recipes, have the ability to follow them or receive emails directly on new posts, peruse 24/7 their recipe indexes, learn some tips, print the recipes, cook, bake, and enjoy! Make […]

via Participating Food Blogs… — “We Graze Together”

Herbs & Spices

Why Rosemary is Sexy

sprigs of rosemary


Rosemary is a relative to the Mint family and the name is derived from its Latin origin to mean “Dew Of The Sea.” Rosemary is very common in Mediterranean Cuisine and has somewhat of a bitter astringent taste to it. While that is true it compliments oily foods very nicely. A tisane can be made from the Rosemary leaves and that is also very popular when cooking.


rosemary-flowers


First it is burned and then added to a BBQ to flavor various foods. Sage, unlike many other herbs has a high nutritional value to it and is rich in Iron, Calcium, and Vitamin B-6 and is more nutritional in its dried form rather than fresh. Rosemary should be harvested just as you are going to use it because it truly loses its flavor once dried. Gardner’s swear that if you plant some Rosemary plants in and around your garden, the Rosemary will fend off moths, beetles, and carrot flies.


Nutritional-facts-rosemary


Older Europeans loved Rosemary and believed that it improved memory and also used it as a symbol of remembrance and was often tossed into fresh graves before they were buried over. Traditionally it has been said that Rosemary, left untrimmed, would grow for thirty three years where it will reach the height of Christ when he was crucified. Many would also place sprigs of Rosemary underneath their pillows to ward of evil and nightmares. Often the wood that comes from the stems of the Rosemary plant was used to make Musical Instruments. Remember that people back then liked to utilize every piece of something as not to waste. Today, many wreaths are made from Rosemary as a symbol of remembrance.


Today, Rosemary is still used for many things besides cooking as it is in potpourris, air fresheners, shampoos, and cosmetics. There has also been scientific evidence that Rosemary works very well as a memory stimulant. Rosemary has also shown some cancer prevention properties in animals. But further Rosemary has shown a strong relationship in relaxing muscles, and to soothe stomach upset as well as menstrual cramps. The main thing to remember when using Rosemary for this purpose is that if you use too much it can actually cause a counter effect.


When made into a tea it is ingested for calming nerves and anxiety and as an antiseptic. Rosemary when used as a tea many people find to taste very good. Making the tea from Rosemary is quite simple actually, just pour boiling water over the leaves and steep for 10-15 minutes. A little sugar can be added by you should not add any cream. A few sprigs can be added to oils and vinegars to flavor the products which add a nice taste for cooking.


rosemarysurayama


When used cosmetically it can lighten and tone human hair and when mixed with equal parts of shampoo it has been known to strengthen hair too. It also makes for a nice additive in hot bath water. Rosemary is still used quite commonly today however more so for cooking than anything else.


Rosemary Links



 

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What is Food Safety? — We Are Chefs

This is part one of a four-part series on building a food safety culture in your establishment by Francine L. Shaw, president, Food Safety Training Solutions, Inc. Many operators tell me that they have established a food safety culture, but when I ask what that means, they struggle to give me a confident answer. So how do…

via What is Food Safety? — We Are Chefs


This is a very important subject,  Food safety is a very important issue for everyone  4 million in Canada alone get food poisoning, also known as “Food-Borne Illness.”

FOOD SAFETY


Fun Food Fact

Top Ten Power Packed Foods

 


What is the secret to a long and Healthy Life? It is in the food that we eat. As you well know, all foods are not created equal. Choosing and eating the right foods may help increase your life expectancy as well as the quality of your life.

Here are ten of the top power packed foods designed to give you Energy, Vitality and all around Good Health!


1. Beans – If they give you gas, take precautions before you eat them. Soaking them first can help. Beans of all kinds (kidney, navy, lentils, chickpeas, Northern) are high in protein. This is plant protein so it contains very little fat, carbs and calories. If fiber is a problem in your diet, eating a healthy portion of beans each day can keep your digestive system healthy.


2. Oatmeal – Oatmeal is coming into popularity as a food that lowers blood cholesterol. You can make it yourself with rolled oats or eat the instant kind if you are in a hurry. Oatmeal is a filling grain that also provides much needed fiber to keep hunger at bay and your blood sugar constant.


3. Fruits – Fruits are filled with antioxidants such as Vitamin C and A. Antioxidants fight Free Radical damage in the body and reduce the risk of Cancer. Berries such as Blueberries and Grapes have the highest amount of antioxidants. But choose an array of fruits in a wide variety of colors for maximum health. The antioxidants in fruit boost the immune system to fight the effects of aging in the body.


4. Allium foods – This class of foods includes garlic, onions, leeks and shallots. Garlic is known for lowering cholesterol. Allium vegetables healp guard the body against the risk of cancer and many other ailments. They also help lower blood pressure and prevent blood clots. Eating these power packed vegetables in their natural state especially garlic increases their health benefits.


5. Salmon – Eating foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids reduces the risk of heart disease and other conditions like atherosclerosis. Wild salmon is a fatty fish but it contains good fats that has been proven to improve health in children and adults. Salmon is rich in protein which is of great use after an exercise session to build muscle tissue.


6. Flax Seed – Like salmon it contains omega-3 fatty acids. These seeds also contain omega-6 and omega-9 fatty acids. You get a lot of power to fight high cholesterol, heart disease and diabetes with this seed. Ground flax seed can be added to fruit smoothies, sprinkled in yogurt, eaten with cereal or added to pancake mix to name a few.


7. Peppers – Peppers are colorful. They contain antioxidants like beta-carotene and Vitamin C. Peppers range from Mild and Sweet to so Hot you’ll be calling the fire department. All peppers contain a substance called capsaicin. Capsaicin has the properties of an anti-inflammatory, a pain reliever, lowers cancer risk and heart disease. They are good in salads, salsa and all sorts of dishes.


8. Nuts And Seeds – Nuts are high in fat but those fats are the good kind. Peanuts, Almonds, Brazil nuts, Walnuts and Pistachios are all providers of good fats and protein. Crush them into a fine powder and use as a coating instead of higher carb bread crumbs. Nuts help to lower cholesterol. Eat them right out of the shell with no additives.


9. Açai – This berry has been in the news lately. It is rich in antioxidants and increases energy. You can get more done and look better while doing it. You can get Acai juice and supplements in your health food store.


10. Yogurt – The fat free variety is good for you. Yogurt contains calcium, Vitamin B, and protein. If you don’t drink milk, yogurt is an alternative to get your calcium in to build strong bones and teeth. Live yogurt also contains friendly bacteria to help promote a healthy digestive system.


Building a better healthier body begins with what you eat. Try these Super Foods to get started on the right foot.


Super Food Links



 

Recipe's

Bacon Salt

Bacon Salt

  • Servings: 1 Cup
  • Difficulty: Easy

Like it’s umami rich friend the porcini, bacon makes everything better. Now with this recipe all your foods can be seasoned with magic yum dust. Sprinkle it over popcorn, baked potatoes, eggs, vegetables, burgers, fries, salads, dips and avocados.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup unrefined salt

  • 8 ounces thin cut bacon

Directions

  1. Preheat your oven to 375F. Crinkle up your parchment so that there are grooves for the bacon grease to drip into, then lay bacon across and cook for until completely crisp. Mine took about 25-30 minutes, but you’ll want to start checking around the 15 minute mark to make sure the bacon doesn’t burn.

  2. Once the bacon is crisp, transfer it to a paper towel and let the grease drain off. Blot it if needed and then place in the coffee grinder and pulse until it reaches the consistency you prefer.

  3. Nearly all versions of bacon salt that I’ve found online call for it to be stored in the fridge. I’m not sure that’s necessary given that salt is used to cure meats, but because I could not find any definitive resources on the subject I decided to keep mine in the fridge just in case

What You’ll Need

Cookie sheet, Parchment paper, Coffee grinder


Recipe's

Bacon Jam

Bacon Jam

  • Servings: 1/2 Cup
  • Difficulty: Easy

Finally a jam that's fit for a burger. You'll want this one on stand by for burger night's or just in general

Ingredients

  • 1/2 pound of Bacon (sliced)

  • 1/4 cup of Shallots (diced)

  • 1/4 cup of Brown Sugar

  • 2 tablespoons of Apple cider vinegar

  • 2 tablespoons of Orange juice (seeded)

  • 2 tablespoons of Bourbon

  • 3 Ginger (peeled; freshly-sliced)

  • 1 Bay Leaf

  • 1/2 teaspoon of Honey

  • Fresh ground pepper

  • 1 Jalapeño pepper (seeded; minced)

Directions

1. Cook the bacon in a large skillet over medium heat until browned and crisp and the fat is rendered, 7 to 10 minutes, stirring often and adjusting the heat as necessary. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the bacon to a paper towel-lined plate to drain, reserving 1 to 2 tablespoons of the bacon fat in the skillet.

2. Add the shallot and jalapeño to the skillet and cook over medium-low heat until the shallot is softened, about 2 minutes, stirring often and scraping up the brown bits from the bottom of the skillet. Return the bacon to the skillet and add the brown sugar, cider vinegar, orange juice, bourbon, ginger and bay leaf.

3. Cover the skillet and let come to a boil, then reduce the heat and let simmer gently, uncovered, until most of the liquid has evaporated, 10 to 15 minutes, stirring occasionally.

4. Remove and discard the bay leaf. Transfer the bacon mixture to a mini food processor and pulse until the bacon is finely diced but not puréed, 10 to 15 times, pausing several times to scrape down the side of the bowl.

5. Place the Bacon Jam in a small bowl and stir in the honey and a couple of grindings of black pepper. Serve with crackers and assorted cheese, if desired. The jam can be refrigerated, covered, for up to 1 week.